Unity of Party or Person?

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Cambodian democracy under threat -- Press Release: UNHCHR

Cambodian democracy under threat

 SCOOP | 12 October 2017

Cambodian democracy under threat from moves against opposition, UN expert warns
GENEVA (12 October 2017) – Civil and political rights in Cambodia are deteriorating rapidly, with deeply worrying implications for forthcoming elections and the future of democracy in the country, a United Nations human rights expert has said.
The stark warning from the Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Cambodia comes after the Ministry of Interior began legal proceedings to dissolve the main opposition party, the Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), whose leader is in custody, and amid possible moves to strip the party of its existing seats in parliament.
“For Cambodians to engage in open and serious political debate, the opposition must be allowed to exist and to function without fear or intimidation,” said the Special Rapporteur, Rhona Smith. “Democracy is about voice and choice. These moves risk leaving many Cambodians without either.
“The dissolution of the CNRP would affect Cambodians’ voice and choice at all levels of government, raising serious concerns about the representativeness of government. I echo the call made last month by the High Commissioner for Human Rights, who urged the government to respect civil and political rights and fundamental freedoms.
“I am also concerned that the government is doing this under the guise of the rule of law,” Professor Smith added.

The CNRP is the only opposition party represented in the National Assembly. General elections are due by July 2018.
The party’s leader, Kem Sokha, remains in pre-trial detention on charges of conspiracy with a foreign power, and faces up to 30 years’ imprisonment if convicted. Since his arrest on 3 September, almost half the CRNP’s 55 members of parliament have left the country.
Professor Smith noted that the legal action against the CNRP, launched in the Supreme Court last Friday, had been made possible by a series of amendments to the Law on Political Parties in March and July this year.
These created additional grounds for dissolving a party, some of which were broad and vague, she said.
Further legislative amendments tabled by the ruling Cambodia People’s Party (CPP) for discussion this week contain elaborate formulae to redistribute the seats of a dissolved party between other parties.
“If these changes were applied to the current situation, it would bring into serious question the political representation of a significant portion of Cambodians,” the Special Rapporteur said.
“Rule of law is about more than the mere application of laws. All laws must respect human rights and must reflect the principles of fairness, justice and public participation. Otherwise, it becomes rule by law, not rule of law.”
She added: "Modern Cambodia was established as a multi-party liberal democracy, respectful and protective of human rights. Its Constitution sought to prevent a return to a single-party state. Those who drafted the Constitution were all too well aware of the consequences of one-party rule."


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